Archives for January 2019

Cinderella

A client asked of we would be able to light a pair of London Plane trees that we planted on either side of her driveway near the road – for the winter season. Of course I said yes. But I should back up. To say that we planted them warrants further explanation. I asked Ralph Plummer, owner of GP Enterprises, to locate, secure and plant a pair of London Planes of substantial size at the street entry of a landscape I designed and installed.

He obliged with a pair of eight inch caliper Planes that topped out at nearly 30 feet tall. I like big elements in the foreground of a landscape composition. That size is a request to focus and a visual invitation. These giant trees frame the view ahead. I had been absorbed with the installation inside the gates. My client made a request to me for a pair of big framing trees outside those gates. I can assure you flat out that my best projects as a designer have a committed and passionate client as a partner.

So back to the lighting of these trees. Of course Rob backed us up at Detroit Garden Works with LED compact string lighting strands that were 110 feet in length, and featured 2000 lights each. We wound the trunks and major branches horizontally with these strands – lots of them. This day in November was 20 degrees. The weather was an enormous challenge to the work, but that is not news where gardening is concerned.

Our lighting via ladders took us up close to 20 feet. My client called to ask when were we coming back to do the rest? I should have known that the limit of our reach on our ladders was a self imposed limit. If the sky was the limit, I was going to need some help. Mike Shecter sent two of his people over with a lift. That machine enabled them to wrap both of the trees much closer to the top.

There are a few landscape companies in my area that offer holiday lighting, but that is a very specialized niche. The purchase and maintenance on a piece of equipment like this has to be very expensive. Not to mention the workman’s compensation policy on people who are working this high off the ground. I was happy to get some help with this project, and even happier that I do not own this machine.

Trees densely wound round with lights is not especially unusual. Many commercial businesses feature very elaborate lighting schemes for the holiday season.  I understand why. The light is dazzling, and uplifting. As in festival of lights. As much as I loved this look, something was missing.

We put together a pair of light garlands in our shop, featuring 100 feet of LED compact lighted zip tied to a corresponding length of LED strands with the larger C-7 size bulbs. As there was no way to draw or describe the installation of the garland, I was part of the install crew. We laid the garland on the ground, and dragged and pulled it until it described a large circle on the ground all around each tree. A ladder, a 6′ 2″ tall person, a 10 foot bamboo stake with a hook at the top, and 4 support people were all we had in the way of equipment.

The lowest point of each loop/swoop is just about 6′ 2″ above the ground. It was easy to have Colin stand underneath the loops so we knew how low to make them. As bright as they are at night, these lights are a little tough to see during the day. The tops of the loops were secured to lighted branches via a zip tie. Having learned this the hard way, I would recommend tagging the ends of each strand of lights with its own zip tie. The technology of these lights is amazing, but they are by no means perfect or foolproof.  If you have a strand go out that cannot be fixed with a new transformer, you want to know the location of the end of that faulty strand. Trying to find it on a cold winter’s day is exasperating, especially considering that this work is next to impossible to do with gloves on.

The gardens added a whole other dimension to the lighting scheme. What was impressive in its scope was now a jewel in the landscape. They have that aura of romance.

I posted this picture that David took the other morning at 8am on . Landscape designer Susan Cohan commented: “Cinderellas!” What a wonderful way to describe them! Though London Planes are stately trees with gorgeous exfoliating bark and luxuriously large leaves, dressed in lights and wreathed in garlands, they are the stuff of fairy tales. Wrought from a very static and hard material, the effect is graceful and dressy.

The snow a couple days ago adds yet another dimension-the warm fire contrasting with the cold ice and snow. Winter lighting and weather play off one another in a way that provides a lot of visual punch while the garden is dormant. They shine forth on all but the sunniest winter days. As sunny winter days are few and far between in my zone, I would not do without the lighted winter landscape.

Several of these pictures were taken by my client. I know she is enjoying them.

I am hoping they make her feel like Cinderella.

The Winter Ahead

We finished the last of our winter container work this past Friday, January 4. The pots on my driveway were the very last of the late work. I do not mind that dead last slot. We have a long winter ahead of us. If I am ready for what Michigan winter weather has to dish out come January, my winter will be all the more tolerable. I was fortunate that we had a few cases of mountain hemlock left. It will stay green the entire winter. But the star of the show will be the lights. The technology behind LED string lighting revolutionized the options for landscape lighting. Every year, this lighting becomes more affordable, durable, and easier to use. Since the light is bright, but diffuse, it makes sense to use them in the winter months, and en masse. I know I wrote the beginning of December about lighting as an element in winter pots, but given that our winter is dead ahead, I thought to broach the topic again.

Detroit Garden Works manufactured steel circles expressly designed to hold multiple wrappings of these lights. It is astonishing how much light they emit. The ring has a four pronged base that goes into the foam and soil in the pot.  They are equally stable with an in ground installation. Each of these winter pots have a 110 foot long strand of warm white LED’s in the greens. The burst of lights in the center come from an all in one lighting product called a lightburst. Multiple bark like stems studded with lights are mounted into a pointed base that can be set in a pot. The overall height is three feet, so it makes a statement on its own. Set in the middle of a grouping of twigs or branches, it provides light from within.  Each stem is flexible, and can be positioned to suit. The end result here is the route from the car to the back door is well lit. This is the practical application of seasonal lighting.

The pleasure of the light is equally important, given there will be little sun and no being outdoors gardening for at least 10 weeks. I see this coming from and going to work. I can see it from the balcony above.  Bear with me, as I have said this too many times. Arranging for temporary winter lighting is a form of gardening. Every plant in the garden that I know of needs light.  So do people.

We took the last 10 bunches of curly willow, and zip tied them to a modified tomato cage. We cut the cage open, so we could encircle the two lindens outside the gate at the shop with them. Once they were in place, we zip tied the forms shut. A length of leftover garland covered the zip ties, and the extension cords.  It only took three of the light burst to illuminate that willow from within. David had the idea to bend and bring some of the light burst branches to the outside. Light inside and out-I was game.

At 5pm today, those lights were already creating a visual stir. As the lighting options get more sophisticated, I feel a need to try them out. Rob makes that easy, as he vets every new product. He sees a lot, and buys a few. He furthermore goes to the trouble of displaying how he thinks the lights can be used. I am always behind him in this regard. I just discovered those light bursts two weeks ago. In the garage, I had the time to study his twig display with a light burst tucked inside. He promises to have them again next year.

These five light rings set in the ground in front of a wall covered by Boston Ivy is the antithesis of the summer view. Do I like one season more than another? No. Every season has its time to shine.

pergola with light garlands and a polestar. The light rings in the foreground are so easy to hang in a window or a tree, and plug in.

Winter container arrangement with LED string lighting in the twigs.

Curly copper willow lashed to a tomato cage, and lighted from underneath

Lighted London Planes

We repurposed these dead crab apples as winter topiaries. The branches were hung with nine inch long glass drops. All of the light came from the bottom. Bottom light in a winter pot

winter light

winter light drama, given a substantial snow

lighting the stairs, 2016.

late day lighting

Night light. Winter lighting that looks like fire warms me up.

That cast iron cistern at the end of the driveway at Detroit Garden Works has for years been dressed for the season at hand, and the season to come. This year was no exception. That cistern is ablaze with light. Rob too several days to bring his lighting idea to a finish.

Thanks, Rob.

New Year’s Day, 2019

Dear friends of mine dress their home and table for the Christmas holidays in a way that never fails to astonish and delight me. I have written about their holiday at least three times before, but I knew this year would be special. They spent the last two Christmas holidays visiting family in the US and abroad. They would be home this year.  M and I started talking about this year’s holiday in June, like we always do. I could say that talking goes on intermittently into the fall, but in fact, I am a listener, happy and intrigued to be privy to how his ideas evolve and gel. I am sure M2 is equally involved in this process. He is the more reserved of the two. The both of them are head over heels involved in the arts and design. They also have a sincere and passionate love of the landscape – this is how we came to meet, and fall for each other. Their holiday begins with the tree. Though they have an outstanding collection of vintage glass ornaments, the tree is always very different.

Their love of nature and the garden is always a substantial part of their tree.  They live on a large property in the country. Most of that property is wild. This year’s tree is chock full of the seedpods from butterfly weed, and assorted other weedy dry stems. The addition of the wild remains of plants foraged from their own property took a few intensely felt weekends. I truly admire and respect that they are able to set aside the demands of their professional lives, and give their all to the design and creation of this tree. It is a tour de force on so many levels.

I knew M had a plan to add clementines and persimmons to the mix. He later added mini Kishu mandarin oranges and kumquats.  I had my doubts about how that would work, but I kept that to myself. At the same time, I knew he was shopping every grocery store and farmers markets in his area for those orange fruits.   I greatly respect his eye. All it takes to be open to anything is the intent to be open.

The result is unique to them, and their point of view. Stunning, every square inch of it.  Their history, interests and passion for the arts and the garden resulted in a holiday expression of great beauty.

This New Year’s Day, I am thinking about those projects this past year that truly engaged me. Those projects that speak to the best, most inventive, and imaginative. And those projects that are created by the love of the landscape on both sides of the design equation. I have many to thank, and much to be thankful for.

As for the holiday created by my friends- thank you. It is a feast for the eyes, the heart and the soul.

aa

The buche de Noel, a culinary creation of theirs – exquisite.